Orca3D Marine CFD


Orca3D Marine CFD is the combination of the Orca3D marine design plug-in for Rhino and the Simerics Multi-Phase (MP) CFD software, to provide a fast, accurate, and easy-to-use CFD solution for the naval architect. By combining a specialized interface in Orca3D and a custom marine template in SimericsMP, we have brought an affordable, powerful, and proven set of analysis tools to the desktop of the designer, without the need to become a CFD specialist.

Watch the Orca3D Marine CFD webinars:

 



  

Why use CFD?

  • Eliminate or reduce model test cost and schedule
  • Improve vessel performance
  • Increase customer confidence in the performance of your design
  • Analyze vessels that are not appropriate for traditional parametric methods

With the Orca3D Marine CFD package, you can:

  • Run resistance and self-propelled analyses for displacement and planing hulls
  • Analyze monohulls and multihulls, with or without appendages
  • Include any type of hull features (e.g., steps, trim tabs, etc.)
  • Analyze longitudinal dynamic instability (porpoising) for planing hulls
  • Compute water and air streamlines

Key benefits of the Orca3D Marine CFD package include:

  • Easy to run with confidence, without the need to be a dedicated CFD specialist
  • Benchmarked with proprietary and public-domain hulls, against full-scale data, model tests, and other analysis codes, with excellent results
  • Fast solver; uses all cores available on the computer (up to 16 cores included in base price; additional cores available for an extra charge)
  • Multiphase capability accurately models the free surface behavior
  • Automated CFD volume meshing in Simerics, using Rhino surface meshes as input
  • Automated setup of the domain and wave refinement zone, based on input from Orca3D
  • Morphing domain grid, as the vessel heaves and pitches
  • Animations of the simulation results (e.g., vessel acceleration, porpoising)
  • 2D/3D display of simulation behavior including dynamic pressure, wave elevation, sinkage and trim, and more

There are two parts to the package; Orca3D Level 2 and Simerics CFD. You need both parts to run a CFD simulation.

The Orca3D CFD interface is included in the Level 2 package. The Simerics CFD code is available directly from us with a 3-month or 12-month license, as well as intermittent licenses that allow you to activate the software on a project-by-project basis. Want to learn how Orca3D Marine CFD could improve your design process? Let us give you a live, on-line demonstration, showing how quickly you can go from your Rhino/Orca3D model to accurate, high-fidelity results! Then request an evaluation license, to see for yourself how easy it is to get accurate results.

System Requirements:

CFD software is CPU, RAM, and storage intensive.

  • 16 GB memory (RAM) or more is recommended
  • Windows 7, 8.1, or 10
  • Storage: a typical simulation can use from 1-3 GB of storage. If you wish to do animations, it can be much higher (e.g., 10-15 GB)
  • The current version will use up to 16 cores on one or more CPUs

EXAMPLE BENCHMARKS 

DTMB Model 5415

 


KCS Containership


Wave Cut Comparison


Technical Papers and Presentations

The Simulation of Ship Maneuvering Using a RANS-Based CFD Tool

SNAME Maritime Convention 2019: Chengjie Wang, Joe Snodgrass, Hui Ding

Maneuverability is an important characteristic of a ship, which affects not only the performance during its daily operation but also its safety under urgent conditions, such as danger of collision. Currently, it draws increasing attention from naval architects during the design stage. The characteristics of hydrodynamic derivatives in maneuvering equations are traditionally obtained from towing tank experiments. In this paper, we present several numerical simulations of typical ship maneuvering using a RANS-based computational fluid dynamics tool. In order to resolve the transient phenomena properly, the explicit volume of fluid method is applied to solve the free surface. The motions of the vessel are captured through an embedded 6-DOF dynamic solver. This kind of simulation provides a more direct reference to naval architects for their design and optimization work. All simulations can be achieved with practical turnaround times on a single workstation.

A Computational Study of High-Speed Planing Hull Performance by a RANS based CFD Tool

World Maritime Technology Conference 2018: Chengjie Wang, Hui Ding, Piotr Bandyk, Lawrence Leibman, Joe Snodgrass

The planing hull form has long been employed in modern marine vehicle design. Its favorable performance in the high-speed range makes it a good candidate for powerboats, yachts, and other high-speed vessels. However, it is challenging to get an accurate and cost-effective prediction of resistance as well as dynamics, i.e., porpoising. The semi-empirical and analytic methods widely used today are based on gross hull parameters, limiting their applicability and accuracy. These methods do not provide details of the flow around the hull and cannot reliably predict dynamic instabilities such as porpoising. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of two different high-speed planing hulls using a RANS-based CFD tool, and compare the predicted sinkage, trim, resistance, and other interesting properties and behaviors with experiments. In order to resolve the transient phenomena properly, the explicit Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is applied to solve the free surface. The transient, steady, and possibly unsteady motions of the vessel are captured through an embedded dynamic solver. Good agreement is shown with experiments, including prediction of dynamics, and results can be achieved with practical turn-around times on a single workstation.

The Use of CFD Simulation in the Design of Motor Yachts and their Associated Appendages

SNAME Maritime Convention 2019: Chengjie Wang, Joe Snodgrass, George Hazen, Hui Ding

The design of high-speed vessels is always a challenging job for naval architects. The semi-empirical and analytic methods widely used today are based on gross hull parameters, limiting their applicability and accuracy. These methods do not provide details of the flow around the hull and therefore cannot be applied to some design concepts like stepped hulls. It becomes more challenging when associated appendages are used in the design, like lifting strakes, spray rails, trim tabs, ventilation pipes, etc. Those designs are usually driven by experience or a trial and error process. In this paper, we present numerical studies on multiple high-speed yachts with different appendage configurations, e.g., different layouts of spray rails and/or lifting strakes, different trim tabs, etc., to illustrate how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can help to guide the design process. The RANS-based CFD tool, SimericsMP+, is used for all simulations and results are compared to towing tank tests and sea trial data. Significant agreement is shown with experiments, including those effects due to appendages, and results can be achieved with practical turnaround times on a single workstation.

The Prediction of the Planing Hull Resistance and Porpoising using RANS based CFD Tool

SNAME Maritime Convention 2017: Chengjie Wang, Hui Ding, Piotr Bandyk

The planing hull form has long been employed in modern marine vehicles design. Its good performance at high speed range makes it a good candidate for powerboats, yachts and high speed vessels. However, it is challenging to get accurate prediction on resistance as well as dynamics, i.e. porpoising. The semi-empirical and analytic methods widely used today are based on gross hull parameters, limiting their applicability and accuracy. These methods do not provide details of the flow around the hull and cannot reliably predict dynamic instabilities such as porpoising. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of a classical planing hull (Fridsma 1969) using a RANS based CFD tool and compare the predicted sinkage, trim, resistance, and porpoising behavior with experiments. In order to resolve the transient phenomena properly, the explicit Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method is applied to solve the free surface. The transient, steady, and possibly unsteady motions of the vessel are captured through an embedded dynamic solver. Good agreement is shown with experiments, including prediction of dynamics, and results can be achieved with practical turn-around times on a single workstation.

 

Orca3D Marine CFD for the MACC Simulation Grand Challenge

Multi-Agency Craft Conference 2018: Bruce Hays, George Hazen, Chengjie Wang, Larry Leibman

In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the US Navy General Purpose Planing Hull (GPPH) and a classical planing hull (Fridsma 1969) using a RANS based CFD tool, and compare the predicted sinkage, trim, resistance, and porpoising behavior with experiments. In order to resolve the transient phenomena properly, the explicit Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method is applied to solve the free surface. The transient, steady, and possibly unsteady motions of the vessel are captured through an embedded dynamic solver.  Good agreement is shown with experiments, including prediction of dynamics, and results can be achieved with practical turn-around times on a single workstation. Semi-automated meshing and setup methods are described, with the goal of allowing naval architects who are not CFD specialists to obtain consistent and reliable results.


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